PT-13 Stearman B-29/B-24 Squadron

Description:

They Call it the Pilot Maker... ?Officially named the Boeing Model 75, this airplane is almost universally known as the "Stearman." The Army designated it the "PT," the Navy the "N2S," and the Canadians called it the "Kaydet." By any name, it is recognized as the quintessential primary trainer for American aviators in World War II. The U.S. Army Air Corps first ordered the Model 75 in 1935, one year after the Stearman Aircraft Company of Wichita, Kansas was acquired by Boeing. This... Read more

Base:

B-29/B-24 Squadron
Fort Worth, TX

Website:

PT-13 Specs
Role
Manufacturer
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They Call it the Pilot Maker...

?Officially named the Boeing Model 75, this airplane is almost universally known as the "Stearman." The Army designated it the "PT," the Navy the "N2S," and the Canadians called it the "Kaydet." By any name, it is recognized as the quintessential primary trainer for American aviators in World War II. The U.S. Army Air Corps first ordered the Model 75 in 1935, one year after the Stearman Aircraft Company of Wichita, Kansas was acquired by Boeing. This two-seat biplane incorporates wood-framed wings with fabric covering and a fuselage with welded steel framework, also fabric covered.

In 1940, with War on the horizon, production ballooned with 3,520 aircraft delivered in that year alone. Other than engines, there is little difference between the PT-13/N2S-2 (Lycoming R-680), the PT-17/N2S-1 (Continental R-670) and PT-18 (Jacobs R-755) Models. Production ceased in February 1945 for an airplane considered rugged, relatively forgiving, and overall an excellent trainer. ?

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